Author Topic: Tips and Tricks  (Read 627 times)

Offline ACE

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Tips and Tricks
« on: June 01, 2018, 02:26:00 PM »
We were (or still are) new the sport of triathlon at some point.  I know I had a ton of questions and lots to learn when I started several years go.  I would like to start compiling a list of helpful tips and tricks or general advice that can help people read through when they are new to the sport. 

I will kick things off with one tip that helped me tremendously in the discipline I struggled with most in the beginning...the swim.

I was never officially a swimmer until a few years ago when I decided to do my first triathlon.  I was told you should breathe bilaterally, which works for many people, but I struggled with it for months.  I finally attended a swim clinic with a great tri coach, Jason Kilderry (RIP).  He told me,  "If you need to breath every stroke to go ahead and do it...you don't have to hold your breath when you run right?"

I changed my breathing pattern and everything started to click much faster and there have been a few races where the swim was my best result.

What was one of the best tips or pieces of advice you were given?

Offline mgrogan

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Re: Tips and Tricks
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2018, 09:12:48 PM »
Two things for me... both having to do with clothing and transition.

First was swim in what you will bike and run in. For me, that was buying a tri-suit. I did one race where I tried to throw on a cycling jersey after the swim and being soaking wet, there was no way that was happening. Lets face it... Im a big guy and walking around like a stuffed sausage in transition wasnt the most pleasant feeling at the beginning... but then you realize no one cares and that everyone is wearing the same thing. So buy a tri suit, forget trying to change while in transition, and have fun.

The other- along the same lines of clothing and being wet, is to roll your socks up. Put them on your feet and then slowly roll them off to your toes. When you setup transition, put them in your shoes so they easily roll back on your feet when you need them. The first time or two trying to pull on dry socks on wet feet was a completely mess.

So- those are my most memorable tips and tricks. Both having to do with putting on dry clothes over wet skin.


Offline ACE

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Re: Tips and Tricks
« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2018, 10:12:10 PM »
I did one race where I tried to throw on a cycling jersey after the swim and being soaking wet, there was no way that was happening.

I had a similar learning at Ironman Mont Tremlant last year.  I swam without my tri-top on.  When it came time to put it on in the transition tent it was next to impossible and I easily spent 5+ minutes trying to dry off so it was easier.

The other- along the same lines of clothing and being wet, is to roll your socks up.

One of my favorite "learnings" as well.  For shorter distance I would love to go sockless, but I have never liked the idea of running without socks (or biking for that matter).

Offline ericlepping

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Re: Tips and Tricks
« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2018, 06:20:25 AM »
TIRE PRESSURE - Stop pumping your tires up to 1,000,000 psi.
Old school thought was that tires at 120psi were faster than 100psi which was faster than 80psi.  When I was a pro team mechanic in the 80s and 90s we KNEW this was true.  Turns out it was wrong.
In general, rolling resistance does not decrease with higher pressures.  What happens is that that harder tires make you think you're faster but that is just road vibration being transmitted through the bike and into your body.  The wattage losses from this vibration are pretty big.  That feeling of going fast because you're getting bounced all over the place is not speed...

So, what does that mean for tire pressure?  No more 120psi.  For most folks 100psi is fine (and maybe too high).  I'm safely in the Clydesdale category and will run 95psi this weekend at Escape The Cape on my tri bike with 25mm tires.  My road bike has 28mm tires that are tubeless and I run those below 80psi.  Lower pressures translate to more comfort without loss of speed.

Read this article and if you're a podcast fan listen to the podcast linked in the article: https://cyclingtips.com/2017/05/what-is-the-optimal-tyre-pressure-2/

Here's a quote from the article: “We were absolutely surprised that the optimum tyre pressure didn’t exist,” said Heine. “We were thinking maybe 120psi. Above that, it gets too uncomfortable, and below that is too slow. But there was no too slow. The tyres started to collapse in the corners before they got slower.”

Coupled with this is tire width - go as wide as your bike will allow.  Again, you're not going to pay a penalty in rolling resistance or aerodynamics.  (Maybe a little weight penalty but it's worth it.)  You'll get all kinds of comfort gains and THAT will likely translate to better training and racing.

Offline ACE

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Re: Tips and Tricks
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2018, 12:58:09 PM »
TIRE PRESSURE - Stop pumping your tires up to 1,000,000 psi.
Old school thought was that tires at 120psi were faster than 100psi which was faster than 80psi.  When I was a pro team mechanic in the 80s and 90s we KNEW this was true.  Turns out it was wrong.
In general, rolling resistance does not decrease with higher pressures.  What happens is that that harder tires make you think you're faster but that is just road vibration being transmitted through the bike and into your body.  The wattage losses from this vibration are pretty big.  That feeling of going fast because you're getting bounced all over the place is not speed...

So, what does that mean for tire pressure?  No more 120psi.  For most folks 100psi is fine (and maybe too high).  I'm safely in the Clydesdale category and will run 95psi this weekend at Escape The Cape on my tri bike with 25mm tires.  My road bike has 28mm tires that are tubeless and I run those below 80psi.  Lower pressures translate to more comfort without loss of speed.

Read this article and if you're a podcast fan listen to the podcast linked in the article: https://cyclingtips.com/2017/05/what-is-the-optimal-tyre-pressure-2/

Here's a quote from the article: “We were absolutely surprised that the optimum tyre pressure didn’t exist,” said Heine. “We were thinking maybe 120psi. Above that, it gets too uncomfortable, and below that is too slow. But there was no too slow. The tyres started to collapse in the corners before they got slower.”

Coupled with this is tire width - go as wide as your bike will allow.  Again, you're not going to pay a penalty in rolling resistance or aerodynamics.  (Maybe a little weight penalty but it's worth it.)  You'll get all kinds of comfort gains and THAT will likely translate to better training and racing.

I usually go between 100-105 PSI knowing I lose a little when I remove the pump.  I wonder if there is a calculator based on tire type, width and rider weight?